SOY

Soy beans are a type of legume.  Eaten whole or as a flour, oil, milk, tofu, or fermented as tempeh, soy sauce or miso.  In addition, soy is used as an additive in a wide variety of foods as a filler, emulsifier and texturiser. Soy is more common than perhaps you would have first thought –  knowing what to look for and reading labels is key.

Adverse reactions to soy are common and may include, digestive problems – pain, nausea, diarrhoea, respiratory – rhinitis and wheezy, skin problems – itchy, hives, rashes or welts, or tingling in the mouth, swelling lips face of tongue and dizziness and headaches. 

Following list is a rough guide:

Soy Foods

Foods that may contain Soy

check labels

Food labels – what to look for

Edamame

Miso

Natto

Okura

Shoyu

Soy beans

Soy carob

Soy

Cheese

Soy crisps

Soy flour

Soy icecream

Soy oil

Soy milk

Soy nuts

Soy sauce

Soy sprouts

Soy yoghurt

Tamari

Tempeh

Tofu

Yuba

Baby formula

Baking mixes

Breads & baked goods

Breadcrumbs & breaded foods

Breakfast cereals

Canned meat & fish in sauces

Coffee substitutes

Commercially made cakes/pies

Confectionary & gum

Crackers

Frozen desserts & ice creams

Gravies & marinades

Instant potatoes

Margarine

Mayonnaise

Non dairy toppings

Pasta & noodles

Pre-pared meals

Processed meats – hotdogs, hamburgers, sausages

Protein bars, drinks & shakes

Salad dressings

Sauces (Asian, teriyaki, Worcestershire)

Snack foods

Soups & broths

Bought spreads & dips

Stock cubes & powder

Vegetable oils

Vegetarian meals

Bulking agents

Emulsifier

Lecithin

Hydrolysed plant protein

Hydrolysed vegetable protein

Mono-diglyceride

Monosodium glutamate (MSG)

Natural flavouring

Protein extender

Soy or soybean

Soy albumin

Soy protein

Soy protein isolate / concentrate

Stabiliser

Thickener

TSF (textured soy flour)

TSP (textured soy protein)

TVP (textured vegetable protein)

Vegetable broth, gum & starch